Pass the Pumpkin: Three Other Fall Healthy Favorites

Though pumpkin has begun to take over the fall scene, there are many other fruits and vegetables to enjoy this time of year – all toting cancer protective nutrients. From apples to zucchini, here are three new ways to enjoy some familiar Autumn fruits and veggies.canstockphoto20734490

Zucchini Fries: Instead of the usual roasted vegetable, give zucchini fries a try. They’re a great alternative to traditional fries and offer less calories and lots of flavor.

Making zucchini fries can be a bit of a tedious process, but the end result is well worth it.

To make “fries,” leave on the skin and cut the zucchini in half width-wise. Then cut it into quarter-inch “planks” length-wise. Dredge the fries in egg white, flour, and a mix of breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese. You can substitute breadcrumbs for Panko crumbs for extra crispiness. Bake your fries at 400 degrees until they are golden brown and crispy on the outside. Serve warm with your favorite dipping sauce or plain. Your family will definitely ask for these again.

Mashing rutabaga and turnips: Both rutabagas and turnips offer a natural sweetness and are lighter than mashed potatoes, making a perfect mashed potato substitute for something different. Continue reading


Chill Out with Fruit Soup

fruit-soup croppedFor a refreshing and healthy change, try ourHealth-e-Recipe for Chilled Fruit Soup with Berries.

Six kinds of fruit go into this slightly tropical tasting soup. First, cubed cantaloupe and both fresh and frozen strawberries and blended together with apples into a delicious pink colored liquid with a touch of lemon juice and sugar. Cantaloupe contains beta-carotene and strawberries supply you with vitamin C, while apples are a good source of cancer-fighting compounds like flavonoids.

Then fresh raspberries and blueberries decorate the soup, adding their own protective compounds of ellagic acid and anthocyanins. With only 140 calories per serving, you get 5 grams of fiber and a winning soup or smoothie to sip. If you refrigerate any leftover soup and it separates, just stir it up before serving a second time.

Find more delicious cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


The Beauty of Beets…Countdown to Vote

beet-salad croppedOnce you’ve tasted fresh beets, you’ll be enchanted by their sweet taste and beautiful color. Our Health-e-Recipe for Beet, Carrot and Apple Salad shreds them with tart Granny Smith apples, carrots and chopped walnuts into a cancer-preventive salad.

Beets contain potassium, vitamin C, folate and fiber. Their phytochemicals include betalains, a class of health-protecting compounds that may be best absorbed when uncooked. Beet greens – which can be eaten lightly steamed – provide lutein, a phytochemical that protects eyesight and is also found in spinach (a botanical relative of beets).

In the U.S., fresh beets are often roasted. Eating them raw is more unusual, yet once you have, you may prefer them to the pickled versions that are high in sodium and may be packaged with added sugar. (Our recipe also tells you how to peel them without coloring your hands red.)

This week’s recipe marks our #499th issue. You can help us pick our milestone 500th Health-e-Recipe by voting in our Championship Round. It’s Lasagna versus Brussels sprouts: Vote in Recipe 500.