Adding a Spicy Zing to Sweet Apple Cider

ginger-turmeric-ciderFor cold weather, a hot drink like our Ginger and Turmeric Hot Cider warms you up fast. Its combination of ginger and turmeric add cancer-preventive compounds to the cider’s phytochemicals for a naturally sweet drink that is at once spicy and soothing.

Turmeric is the spice that gives curry powder its yellow color. By itself, dried ground turmeric doesn’t taste very strong and has a slightly peppery, earthy quality. But its health-protective qualities that are similar to ginger’s. Both are roots that contain compounds found in research studies to have antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties that protect cells against damage linked to cancer.

The color of turmeric comes from the phytochemical curcumin. The spice was used as a yellowing dye since 600 BCE, according to archeological finds in Assyria. It was less expensive than saffron, and has traditionally been used in India to color the rice served at weddings, a cosmetic, a skin tonic and as a folk remedy for stomach and liver ailments.

If you can find fresh turmeric root at an Asian or health food market, try it in this recipe; if not, just use ¼ teaspoon of dried turmeric for each serving of cider. A dash of ground turmeric can also be added to brown rice while it cooks to make the color more appealing, as well as stirred into lentil, green pea or tomato soup to enhance flavor. Hummus dip, salad dressing and stir-fries are other tasty places for turmeric.

Ginger gives a spicy zing to winter dishes. It not only adds a kick to cider, but minced fresh ginger is a key ingredient for Asian-style stir-fries and garlic sauces and tastes great in baked fruit recipes like apple crisp or fruit compote. Most grocery stores carry fresh ginger root – a little bit gives you a lot of flavor, much more than dried ground ginger.

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Pass the Pumpkin: Three Other Fall Healthy Favorites

Though pumpkin has begun to take over the fall scene, there are many other fruits and vegetables to enjoy this time of year – all toting cancer protective nutrients. From apples to zucchini, here are three new ways to enjoy some familiar Autumn fruits and veggies.canstockphoto20734490

Zucchini Fries: Instead of the usual roasted vegetable, give zucchini fries a try. They’re a great alternative to traditional fries and offer less calories and lots of flavor.

Making zucchini fries can be a bit of a tedious process, but the end result is well worth it.

To make “fries,” leave on the skin and cut the zucchini in half width-wise. Then cut it into quarter-inch “planks” length-wise. Dredge the fries in egg white, flour, and a mix of breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese. You can substitute breadcrumbs for Panko crumbs for extra crispiness. Bake your fries at 400 degrees until they are golden brown and crispy on the outside. Serve warm with your favorite dipping sauce or plain. Your family will definitely ask for these again.

Mashing rutabaga and turnips: Both rutabagas and turnips offer a natural sweetness and are lighter than mashed potatoes, making a perfect mashed potato substitute for something different. Continue reading


Chill Out with Fruit Soup

fruit-soup croppedFor a refreshing and healthy change, try ourHealth-e-Recipe for Chilled Fruit Soup with Berries.

Six kinds of fruit go into this slightly tropical tasting soup. First, cubed cantaloupe and both fresh and frozen strawberries and blended together with apples into a delicious pink colored liquid with a touch of lemon juice and sugar. Cantaloupe contains beta-carotene and strawberries supply you with vitamin C, while apples are a good source of cancer-fighting compounds like flavonoids.

Then fresh raspberries and blueberries decorate the soup, adding their own protective compounds of ellagic acid and anthocyanins. With only 140 calories per serving, you get 5 grams of fiber and a winning soup or smoothie to sip. If you refrigerate any leftover soup and it separates, just stir it up before serving a second time.

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