Think Vegetables are Boring? For Spring Veggies, Try This

If vegetables aren’t the all-star of your meal, and you – like many of my clients – think of vegetables as bland or boring, think again. canstockphoto24567903

With the spring weather upon us, this is a great time of year to increase your intake of fresh seasonal veggies. Vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients that protect your health, including reducing your risk of cancer and heart disease. While you may know this, rather than eating vegetables because you feel like you should eat them, start eating them because you enjoy them.

Below are ten of my favorite ways to flavor your spring-time veggies. Continue reading


Talk to Your Teens About Cancer Prevention

Parents are teens’ top source of health information, according to a new study from Northwestern University. This is important for helping your teens learn about a topic they are probably not thinking a lot about: cancer prevention.

The “Teens, Health & Technology” survey included a nationally representative group of American teenagers between the ages of 13 and 18. Fifty-five percent of teens reported that they got “a lot” of their health information from parents, followed by health classes at school, medical providers, and the Internet (see below). This means that, for the majority of teens, the conversation about cancer prevention has to begin at home.

Chart_Teens

*13-18 year olds who say they get “a lot” – Source: Teens, Health and Technology survey, June 2015.

The habits your teens are forming now will likely follow them into adulthood, so now is the time to start building positive health-promoting habits.

Here are 4 things parents can do to teach teens about cancer prevention: Continue reading


Cancer Prevention Begins at Your Kitchen Table: Transforming the Cancer Agenda

Half of cancers – one of every two cases – can be prevented and so often it’s about applying what we already know. That was the simple but powerful message at the first Cancer Prevention Summit held by the New York State Department I attended last week. The overarching message of the Summit was simple: 50% of cancers can be prevented and in New York State, where approximately 35,000 people die from cancer each year, primary cancer prevention is an urgent public health priority.

50-infographic-bigExperts spoke about vaccinating against HPV and preventing tobacco use, two major causes of cancers. What fewer people may know is there are concrete things that we can do to reduce our risk. Maintaining a healthy weight, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating well can prevent approximately one of three of the most common cancers.

Summit highlights included:

Shift the discussion to the notion that “cancer is preventable.” Begin to focus effort and awareness on risk reduction through modifiable lifestyle habits. This includes eating a predominantly plant-based diet, achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, using sunscreen, participating in cancer screening, and avoiding tobacco use and heavy alcohol. Continue reading