Ultra processed foods like packaged snacks, chicken nuggets, associated with cancer risk

By Posted on Leave a comment on Ultra processed foods like packaged snacks, chicken nuggets, associated with cancer risk

Most Americans are probably aware that a steady diet of foods like chicken nuggets, candy bars and sodas are not a path to health, yet their low cost and easy access  mean these foods are becoming a regular part of many people’s diets in the US and around the world. AICR’s research shows that highly processed foods with added fats and sugars contribute to weight gain and having obesity, thus raising the risk for cancers such as colorectal, endometrial and post-menopausal breast. Now, a population study explores whether there is a direct association between eating these ultra-processed foods and cancer risk.

Consumption of ultra-processed foods and cancer risk, published in the British Medical Journal used data from a French cohort called the NutriNet-Santé study, established in 2009, to look at associations between food, nutrition and health. For this study, researchers reviewed diet records from about 105,000 adults to determine the percentage of ultra-processed foods in their diets, using a food processing classification system called NOVA. The ultra-processed group includes foods such as sodas, sweet or savory packaged snacks, mass produced packaged breads and pastries, chicken and fish nuggets, sausages, and packaged instant soups and noodles. Read more… “Ultra processed foods like packaged snacks, chicken nuggets, associated with cancer risk”

SHARE:

    Favorite Cancer-Fighting Football Snacks

    By Posted on Leave a comment on Favorite Cancer-Fighting Football Snacks

    What time is it? GAME FOOD TIME! Football season is getting intense, and it’s the perfect time to host a party with friends (or rivals) and serve up some of our easy cancer-fighting snacks and sides.

    Turn up the heat this weekend with spicy homemade sweet potato fries. Sweet potatoes are rich in beta-carotene and foods containing beta-carotene are linked to lower risk of esophageal cancer. Beta-carotene is better absorbed with a little fat which you’ll get from the olive oil in our recipe below.

    Read more… “Favorite Cancer-Fighting Football Snacks”

    SHARE:

      Do salads make sense in winter?

      By Posted on Leave a comment on Do salads make sense in winter?

      Salads, although not essential for a healthy meal, do still make sense in winter! It’s an opportunity to try different ingredients than what you use in a summer salad.

      Winter Salads: Rethinking Ingredients
      Greens: Today’s grocery stores stock all types of lettuce year-round, so you don’t have to switch up your greens for winter. For more seasonal fun, however, try kale or the winter versions of spinach, which stand up well to hearty flavors. These greens are high in beta-carotene, lutein, and vitamin C, and spinach is a good source of the B vitamin folate that helps protect our DNA.

      Read more… “Do salads make sense in winter?”

      SHARE: