Yummy, Healthy Singapore Noodles

singapore-noodlesYou’ll find curries in Indian restaurants and noodles in Chinese restaurants, but you may not find curried noodles unless there’s a Malaysian place in your neighborhood. If not, we offer AICR’s healthy version of Singapore Noodles, a dish that blends Chinese, Indian and Malay influences in a cancer-fighting dish using whole-grain brown rice noodles.

Like Singapore, an island nation that grew up as a multicultural trading post in the Southeast Asia next door to Indonesia, Singapore Noodles is a mixture of diverse ingredients. Vegetables, rice vermicelli, shrimp, egg and chicken are sautéed with curry powder. Curry itself is yet another mixture of spices ranging from ginger and turmeric to pepper and cardamom. In this recipe, we add a little more turmeric, a mild-tasting spice that is related to ginger. Both are anti-inflammatory spices that studies indicate may help to reduce cancer risk.

The health-protecting spicy red onion, bell peppers, scallions and cabbage are commonly used in Singapore Noodles. Adding egg to stir-fries is also a feature of Malaysian and Indonesian cooking. To include the egg’s bit of saturated fat, we’ve changed the traditional bits of pork (a red meat) in this dish to chicken or turkey breast and used a few small shrimp to produce an authentic flavor. A touch of sesame oil at the end makes it perfect and still lower in fat than you’d find this dish to be in most restaurants.

Find more delicious Healthy AICR recipes. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Want to Sip on Something Sweet -and Healthy? Try this.

Although most people recognize that soda may pose health risks, many are unaware of the damaging effects of other ‘sugary’ beverages, such as fruit and sports drinks. (It was the topic of a Cancer Research Update last month.)canstockphoto14236519

It’s easy to gain weight from drinking sweetened beverages, and since obesity is linked to increased cancer risk, decreasing consumption of these drinks can help you both lose weight and decrease your cancer risk.

However, if you’re like me, you might not enjoy drinking plain water. This can make it challenging to cut back on sweetened beverages.

If you regularly drink juice, soda or sports drinks, start by using smaller sized cups and set goals to wean yourself off rather than going cold-turkey. For example, instead of 3 cups per day, reduce the amount to 1 cup per day, then after a week or two, reduce the amount further to 1 cup every other day. Write out a plan that will allow you to wean off of the beverage completely (or to only 1 time per week) over the next few months. I have seen this strategy work very well for patients of mine – it’s easier to adapt if you change your behaviors slowly.

In addition to cutting back, find low-sugar beverage alternatives you enjoy to have instead. Here are some of my favorite alternatives to sugary drinks that are still full of flavor, and just a tad sweet:

Iced teas – Try out different types of tea until you find one you like (or continually change it up so you don’t get bored). Some great options are mint, passion tea, hibiscus, chai or black raspberry. Make a big batch on the weekend and keep it in a large pitcher in your fridge. If you still need a little sweetness, add just a teaspoon of honey or agave to your tea (or one tablespoon for the pitcher). Some of these teas, like chai, taste great with a little skim or almond milk.

Flavor your water with fruit – You can simply add fresh lemon or lime, but if you’re looking for sweeter flavors, try combinations like fresh pineapple and mint, pear with fresh ginger and a cinnamon stick, or a handful or any frozen berries (which helps cut the cost of using lots of fresh fruit). Most fruit will stay fine for a week when kept in the fridge, so you can keep adding water to the pitcher as it empties (and change out for new fruit once a week). For more ideas, read this  blog I wrote on flavoring your own water.

Sparkling water and juice – Instead of a full glass of fruit juice, fill your cup with sparkling water and add just a splash of your favorite juice (orange, grapefruit, pineapple or cranberry are all good options).

canstockphoto7522520It’s also worth purchasing a glass pitcher with a spout at the bottom that fits in your fridge. This makes it convenient and easy to grab a healthier drink.

What are your favorite ways to stay hydrated with less sugar?

Sonja Goedkoop, MSPH, RD, is a clinical dietitian at the Massachusetts General Hospital Weight Center. She has a passion for promoting a healthy lifestyle and reducing obesity through improved nutrition and physical activity. You can follow her @SonjaGoedkoopRD on twitter.


Special Holiday Foods: Cancer Fighters on Your Plate

At holiday meals we enjoy foods that may not typically be part of our healthy, cancer-preventive plate, like ham. And some holiday foods have religious significance taking a special place on our menu – like eggs or wine.Easter Background, Chocolate Bunny, Spotted Eggs, Daffodils

Both Easter and Passover combine family, religious and cultural traditions full of meaning and comfort, so we savor these special foods and menus. But you can also dress up your plate and menu with seasonal and other holiday foods that add color, nutrition and cancer-fighting substances.

  • Asparagus: This cheerful bearer of spring adds beauty to your table along with vitamins A, C and K, folate and cancer-fighting fiber to your diet.
  • Hot Cross Buns: If these are staples at your Easter morning breakfast, this year try substituting whole wheat flour for half of the white flour in your favorite recipe. Whole grains contain many cancer-fighting substances and as foods high in fiber, they help protect against colorectal cancer.
  • Spring Greens: Look for tender baby greens – spinach, kale, chard – these are packed with the antioxidant vitamins A and C. They’re great as salads, or added to egg dishes, like frittatas, omelets or casseroles. Try our Kale Frittata with Tomato and Basil.

    Plate for the Seder

    Plate for the Seder

  • Dark Chocolate: A small amount of this phytochemical rich food can go a long way. Serve a beautiful dessert plate with small chunks of dark chocolate, fresh strawberries and toasted walnuts. Or make chocolate covered matzah for snacks and dessert.
  • Herbs: A part of the Seder plate, these symbols of spring can add flavor and powerful cancer-fighting substances at any meal. Learn more about herbs and try our Pomegranate Salsa for color and a little bite.
  • Matzah Ball Soup: So soothing and comforting, you can add a little more color and nutrition with carrots, parsnips, onions and other delicious veggies. You might even try making the matzah balls with whole wheat matzah for more cancer protection.

For more ideas check out our Matzoh Brie, ways to get active this weekend and more Cancer-Fighting Easter recipes.