Can blackened toast and crispy french fries lead to cancer? AICR weighs in

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Can burned toast and blackened potatoes lead to cancer? It’s a story making headlines today because of an initiative a UK government agency has taken to highlight a substance found in these products that are a “possible concern” for increased cancer risk.

The compound is called acrylamide and it’s generally formed when you cook up some starchy foods at high temperatures, over 120 degrees. The sugars and amino acids in the foods cause a reaction, the Maillard reaction, which leads to acrylamide.

In lab studies, animals consuming higher amounts of acrylamide get more cancer. Yet human studies on an acrylamide-cancer link are inconclusive.  Read more… “Can blackened toast and crispy french fries lead to cancer? AICR weighs in”

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    What’s Missing in the Latest Diet Rankings? Best Cancer Prevention Diet

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    US News and World Report published its latest rankings of diets on the best ones for health, including for weight loss, diabetes and heart health. But with an estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases in 2016, the rankings missed an important category: cancer prevention.

    AICR – along with that of other major health organizations – now clearly recognize that diet plays an important role in reducing risk for many common cancers.

    AICR’s New American Plate is our nominee for Best Cancer Prevention Diet. AICR Recommendations for Cancer Prevention offer clear guidance on how diet affects cancer risk and the New American Plate is a model for putting those recommendations into practice. Read more… “What’s Missing in the Latest Diet Rankings? Best Cancer Prevention Diet”

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      For diet and cancer prevention, do we really know enough to act?

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      We do know enough now to make eating choices that lower our risk of cancer. In fact, we know that for people with typical American diets, waiting for more information before making any changes is increasing their risk of cancer.

      It’s true that research on diet to lower cancer risk is a hot area with many questions still to be answered. That’s why it’s important when making changes to make your decisions on guidelines based on the overall body of research. Trying to act on each new study that makes headlines can make you feel like you’ve got whiplash… not a wise approach.

      This year’s AICR Research Conference featured the renowned Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University presenting his view of what we know and don’t know on diet and cancer. Here’s my take, based on Dr. Willett’s presentation and others at the conference. Read more… “For diet and cancer prevention, do we really know enough to act?”

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