Recipe: Layers of Cancer Protection

Roasted Veg Lasagna copyOur Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Vegetable Lasagna is meatless and full of hearty, delicious cancer-fighting ingredients. It’s also runner-up to our March Madness winner, Brussels Sprout Slaw.

To prepare the eggplant and zucchini slices for roasting, you can either use canola oil cooking spray or brush them lightly with some olive oil, if you prefer. Then roast them for 20 minutes on each side. Roasting veggies makes them sweet and tender.

Then layer them onto the low-fat cheese mixture and top with tomato sauce. All processed tomato products (think juice, paste, sauce) contain plenty of lycopene. This compound is a carotenoid that may help guard against prostate and other cancers, according to research studies.

Because of their higher fiber content, whole-wheat pastas and other whole grains take longer to digest than refined grains. That’s one reason why eating them can help keep your blood sugar levels healthy.

Together with the vegetables in this dish, the higher fiber in the noodles provides a substantial 11 grams of fiber per serving. That’s almost one-third of the amount recommended daily by health experts. Eating plenty of high-fiber foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans while keeping meat consumption low can help prevent colorectal cancer.

Find more healthy, tasty recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


The Beauty of Beets…Countdown to Vote

beet-salad croppedOnce you’ve tasted fresh beets, you’ll be enchanted by their sweet taste and beautiful color. Our Health-e-Recipe for Beet, Carrot and Apple Salad shreds them with tart Granny Smith apples, carrots and chopped walnuts into a cancer-preventive salad.

Beets contain potassium, vitamin C, folate and fiber. Their phytochemicals include betalains, a class of health-protecting compounds that may be best absorbed when uncooked. Beet greens – which can be eaten lightly steamed – provide lutein, a phytochemical that protects eyesight and is also found in spinach (a botanical relative of beets).

In the U.S., fresh beets are often roasted. Eating them raw is more unusual, yet once you have, you may prefer them to the pickled versions that are high in sodium and may be packaged with added sugar. (Our recipe also tells you how to peel them without coloring your hands red.)

This week’s recipe marks our #499th issue. You can help us pick our milestone 500th Health-e-Recipe by voting in our Championship Round. It’s Lasagna versus Brussels sprouts: Vote in Recipe 500.


A Cookie with a History (and Whole Grains)

anzac-cookies croppedApril is the month when soldiers in the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) fought the famous World War I battle at Gallipoli. Their bravery has been commemorated in part with a treat featured in our Health-e-Recipe for ANZAC Cookies.

Whole-wheat pastry flour plus oats and unsweetened shredded coconut help to make this cookie unique. Both contain dietary fiber that prevents colorectal cancer and possibly other types of cancer. These cookies are as nutritious today as when they were developed back then and sent to the troops in care packages from home.

You can make your own ANZAC Cookies to fortify yourself during a busy day. Enjoy them as a snack, a filling dessert or even a breakfast treat completed with some protein like low-fat yogurt and fruit.

This cookie makes us two shy of our 500th Health-e-Recipe. Vote for your pick of our milestone recipe on our Recipe March Madness, where you can also subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.