Continental Coffee: Five Ways to Drink Coffee Around the World

Heather Victoria Photography-Iced Coffee-15

Heather Victoria Photography

How do you like your coffee – black, with milk, sugar or iced? People around the world enjoy coffee – it’s one of the most popular beverages. And, according to the latest AICR/WCRF Continuous Update Reports, coffee lowers risk for endometrial and liver cancers.

AICR recently featured a delicious cold brew coffee recipe, so that inspired me to learn how people around the world consume this beverage. I found a huge variety, both surprising and somewhat familiar. Perhaps these ideas will inspire you to find a new way to prepare your coffee tomorrow morning.

My Coffee Finds:

-Europe: Espresso’s birth place is Europe. It’s often consumed with no dairy or sweetener and served with a slice of lemon or lemon rind. The lemon slice or rind helps to enhance the different notes in the coffee. Continue reading

Grilling Up a Patriotic and Cancer Preventive Plate

On this fourth of July, treat your family and friends to a healthy, delicious and cancer-protective backyard barbecue featuring a patriotic red, white and blue menu.

Brightly colored seasonal and familiar favorites like watermelon and blueberries are always welcome, but it’s also a great time to introduce new food ideas that fit on AICR’s New American Plate – a plant-focused way of eating for cancer prevention.20286510_m

1. Grilling in White: Fish is tasty done on the grill – whether you go with steaks, fillets (try a wire grill basket) or whole fish, marinating ahead of time keeps it moist, flavorful and may help reduce formation of certain carcinogenic compounds that form on animal protein with high heat and charring. Try our Tilapia with Warm Tomato Salsa or Moroccan Grilled Fish with Charmoula. Continue reading

A Vegan Saag Packed with a Medley of Cancer-Protection

spinach-saag-and-golden-tofu copyFans of Indian food know that saag is a spinach sauce seasoned with cumin, turmeric and other spices that have cancer-preventing qualities. Our new Healthy Recipe for Spinach Saag (pronounced sog) uses health-protective soy as the protein in this delicious dish.

Restaurants feature saag made with paneer, a type of Indian cottage cheese. Paneer has a similar texture and color to firm tofu, made from soybeans. Soy adds protein, nutrients and a set of phytochemicals called isoflavones to your foods.

In this recipe, the tofu is given an appetizing golden color from sautéing first in neutrally-flavored canola oil. If the canola oil doesn’t produce enough of a golden effect, stir in a pinch of turmeric as you sautee it. When you add the tofu to the spinach sauce, it will absorb the flavors of the turmeric, ginger, cumin, coriander, garam masala spice mix and onions. Continue reading