Trial Shows Vitamin D, Calcium Supplements Don’t Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk

For those who have had possible precancerous growths removed from their colon/rectum — common among adults — taking vitamin D and/or calcium supplements does not reduce the risk of developing further growths, finds a randomized study reported in the New England Journal Of Medicine. The multi-year trial adds to the evidence that supplements Composition With Variety Of Drug Pills And Dietary Supplementsdo not protect against colorectal cancers.

While there are many reasons to take supplements, AICR recommends not to rely on supplements for cancer protection.

The 2,259 people in this study all had colorectal abnormal growths, called adenomas or polyps. Some of these growths on the lining of the colon or rectum could eventually lead to colorectal cancer, which is why they are commonly removed.

Within four months of having the polyps removed, the participants (who were 45 to 75 years old) were placed into a group where he/she took a daily dietary supplement of vitamin D, calcium, both or neither. The study was blinded so neither the researchers nor participants knew what they were taking. And when they joined the study, everyone had normal levels of calcium or vitamin D.  Continue reading

Heart Healthy Mediterranean Diet May Cut Breast Cancer Risk

canstockphoto13663884For years, we’ve heard a lot about the heart health benefits of the Mediterranean Diet. Now an analysis from a randomized trial suggests this diet, supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil and nuts, may help lower risk of breast cancer.

The analysis, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, is from the PREDIMED trial – a 6 year study that includes data from over 4000 women, 60-80 years old and at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The women had been assigned to follow one of three diets, a Mediterranean diet where they received extra virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet with provided mixed nuts, or they were advised to follow a low fat diet. The women had quarterly sessions with a dietitian to assess how well they were following the diet.

At the end of the study, the women following the Mediterranean diet with olive oil showed a 62% lower risk of malignant breast cancer than the control, low fat diet group. When researchers put the olive oil and nuts groups together, there was a 51% relative risk reduction compared to the control group. Continue reading

Study: For Women, Young and Older, Alcohol Ups Breast Cancer Risk

Research clearly shows that alcohol increases risk for breast cancer overall. Now, a study published this week in the International Journal of Cancer finds that drinking alcohol increases risk for nearly all breast tumor types, especially when women start drinking as young adults. The risk is modest, but it shows one way women can take steps to lower their risk.alcohol-serving-sizes

Using data from the European Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) study, researchers included 335,000 women from ten European countries and of those,11,576 participants had breast cancer diagnoses after an average of 11 years follow-up. Data on participants included BMI, waist to hip ratio, smoking status, physical activity, education level and diet information. The authors calculated how much alcohol women drank over their life, based on surveys the women filled out on what they drank in their 20s and beyond. About 15% of the women drank more than one alcoholic drink daily. Continue reading