Massive new study, activity cuts risk of 13 cancers

By Posted on Leave a comment on Massive new study, activity cuts risk of 13 cancers

A large new study that pooled together data from a dozen studies found that those who walk, swim, jog or do other sorts of activity the most are at lower risk of developing 13 different types of cancer compared to those who are the least active. The study included almost 1.5 million participants and supports the importance of physical activity for lower cancer risk.

It was published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Activity MashupAICR research shows that activity lowers risk of colon, breast, and endometrial cancers. There is some evidence being active may play a role in other cancers, but many of these studies are relatively small; AICR continues to analyze the research – including this study – as part of its Continuous Update Project.

The strength of this study was that it could pool together cancers that are not as common. Here, researchers included 12 population studies from the United States and Europe to look at how physical activity links to 26 cancer types. All together, the studies included 1.4 million men and women, ages 18 to 98. The average age was 59. Read more… “Massive new study, activity cuts risk of 13 cancers”

SHARE:

    White House focuses on microbiome, the trillions of microbes that link to cancer risk

    By Posted on 3 Comments on White House focuses on microbiome, the trillions of microbes that link to cancer risk

    The bacteria and other microbes living inside us will soon get a much closer look, with the White House announcing a major new initiative today that promises to speed up our understanding of how the trillions of microorganisms play a role in diseases, such as cancer.

    The National Microbiome Initiative is a collaboration of government and private industry and it has a broad aim to understand the microorganism communities on Earth and beyond. These communities include bacteria, viruses and fungi. As part of the Initiative the government pledged to support more than $121 million over the next couple years to research. That includes everything from investigating microbes’ role in land, sea, and space. It also involves looking at microbes in animals, including us humans.

    1214977_sA lot of the microbiome research already involves human health. Largely ignored until recently, scientists now know that our skin, mouth, gut and almost every part of our body is teeming with microbes that we depend upon for good health. Whether these microbes outnumber human cells ten to one or they’re about even, we know there are trillions of them. And that they are important. Read more… “White House focuses on microbiome, the trillions of microbes that link to cancer risk”

    SHARE:

      Behind The Headlines: Questions about AICR’s Stomach Cancer Report

      By Posted on 1 Comment on Behind The Headlines: Questions about AICR’s Stomach Cancer Report

      We’ve just released our latest systematic review of the global literature linking diet, weight and physical activity to an individual cancer; this time, it’s stomach cancer in the spotlight, and there’s some striking news.

      The report’s three major findings – that alcohol, processed meat and obesity increase the risk for stomach cancers – are entirely new. Much of the research makes important distinctions that previous research didn’t, and there’s more to know about stomach cancer risk than easily fits into a headline. Here, we answer questions about some of the nuances that have emerged.

      Two of these three new risk factors apply to distinct types of stomach cancer, cardia and non-cardia. What’s the difference? Read more… “Behind The Headlines: Questions about AICR’s Stomach Cancer Report”

      SHARE: