Wake Up with Quinoa

creamy-quinoa-oat-porridge copy 3On a chilly morning when you want a special treat, bypass the fatty pastries and warm up with our Health-e-Recipe for Creamy Quinoa Oat Porridge.

It’s a delicious way to eat quinoa, a whole grain that supplies a hefty amount of protein (8 grams) and fiber (5 grams) per cup cooked. This recipe mixes it with oats to smooth out the texture and sweetens it with apple, almond milk, cider, cinnamon and maple syrup.

All plant foods contain dietary fiber, found by AICR’s report and its continuous updates to show strong evidence of colon cancer prevention. Fiber also causes gut bacteria to produce a substance called butyrate, which may help prevent cancer in the digestive tract. Whole grains like quinoa and oats are filling and more slowly digested than refined carbs (sugar and refined grains), so your energy lasts longer and blood sugar stays on an even keel.

Flaxseed is another potential cancer-fighting food, with possibly able to ward off breast cancer. Here, it puts a finishing touch on what is already a super-healthy breakfast. (Chopped walnuts are a cancer-fighting substitute if you can’t find ground flaxseed.)

Find more excellent healthy recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Gaps in Breast Cancer Research: Getting You to Eat Well and Exercise

You may know that being a healthy weight and exercising can cut your risk of breast cancer, but understanding how to translate these recommendations into action is one of the “critical gaps” in research that can save lives, finds a new study published in Breast Cancer Research.Unveiling #1 - Covered & Confident

The study, which comes at the start of Breast Cancer Awareness month, identifies ten critical gaps in breast cancer research. The authors include more than 100 experts.

Developing interventions and support to improve breast cancer survivors’ health and well-being is another gap in the research. Other critical areas where more research is needed include genetics, molecular markers, treatment and tailored screening and survivorship materials. Convincing clinicians to shift their practice into prevention is another area that needs work, according to the study.

You can read all ten gaps the authors identify in the paper.

As the study points out, when it comes to lifestyle change for breast cancer prevention, there remain many unknowns. We don’t know the relative affect of lifestyle changes on lowering the risk of different types of breast cancers, such as ER negative or ER positive. Does the effect of eating habits depend upon whether you are 15 years old or 50? And how many years do these lifestyle interventions offer protection? Continue reading


Women, Weight Loss and Cancer Risk

One of the big findings from AICR’s new report is that excess body fat increases a woman’s risk of endometrial cancer. Research already shows that being overweight increases risk of other cancers, such as post-menopausal breast and colorectal.Woman's Feet on a Scale

Maintaining a healthy body weight plays a key role in good health for both men and women – but as women, there are unique obstacles we face that can make weight loss a bit harder. Here are a few weight challenges I’ve seen women face and ways to overcome them.

  • Calorie needs. Women generally have a slower metabolism (due to differences in body build) compared to men. For example, the calorie needs for a sedentary, 35 year-old women who is 150 pounds and 5’5” inches tall are about 1,800 per day, while those for a man of the same age, height and weight are about 2,000 calories per day.

Overcome it by making healthier choices at restaurants (swap the fries or mashed potatoes for steamed vegetables) and keep portions in check. Recognize everyone has different calorie needs – eat based on your own hunger and fullness, not based on what others are eating. Continue reading