Study: Drinking Coffee Links to Lower Melanoma Risk

Melanoma is one of the most common cancers in the US and is the leading cause of skin cancer death. The National Cancer Institute estimates there will be 74,000 new cases in 2015. Currently, the only established lifestyle risk factor for this disease is exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), primarily from sun and tanning beds.Coffee still life

Now, a new analysis from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study links coffee drinking with lower risk for the most aggressive form of melanoma. The study used data from 1/2 million non-Hispanic whites who were cancer-free and aged 50-71 when the study began in 1995.

The researchers looked at participants’ daily coffee intake – none; one cup or less; 2-3 cups or 4 or more cups. They found that those drinking 4 or more cups of coffee a day had a 20% lower risk for the aggressive type of melanoma – called malignant melanoma – compared to non-coffee drinkers. Then, they looked at whether participants drank decaf or caffeinated coffee. They did not find a significant difference in malignant melanoma risk for decaf drinkers compared to non-drinkers, but for those who drank regular coffee, there was a 25% lower risk compared to non-coffee consumers. Continue reading


Tasty Swaps to Help You Eat Less Red and Processed Meats

By now you’ve probably heard about the report last week categorizing hot dogs, bacon and other processed meats as a cause of colorectal cancer, and probably red meats also. In general, that supports AICR’s longstanding and continuous analysis of the research.

Since 2007, AICR has recommended to avoid processed meat and eat no more than 18 ounces of (cooked) red meat weekly to lower cancer risk. If you’re used to eating red meat or that daily salami sandwich, shifting your diet may seem daunting.

Here are swap suggestions to help. For the recipes, visit our updated Healthy Recipes.

Processed meat swapsAnd if you want to cut down on red meats… Continue reading


Bacon, Hot Dogs and Lunch Meat – Is it Processed Meat?

Today, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) named processed meat as a carcinogen. AICR has included avoiding processed meat as one of our recommendations for cancer prevention since 2007. Processed meat (and high amounts of red meat) increase risk for colorectal cancer.

Here’s our statement on the WHO report.

Both organizations found that for processed meat, even small amounts eaten daily – 50 grams or 1 small hot dog – increases risk for colorectal cancer by 18% compared to eating none.Red Processed Meat Rec

So what exactly is “processed meat”?

AICR defines processed meat as:

“meat preserved by smoking, curing or salting, or addition of chemical preservatives.” Ham, bacon, pastrami, sausages, hot dogs and cold cuts are all considered processed meat. Continue reading