A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth

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A hormone produced by the liver called fibroblast growth factor 21, or FGF21, might play a role in curbing your sweet cravings, suggests a recent study published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

The brain and gut (which includes the liver) work together in what’s called the central reward system to control what we like and choose to eat – including sweets. Differences in that system can promote unhealthy eating habits, which can lead to obesity, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Read more… “A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth”

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    Bone-derived Hormone Regulates Appetite in Mice

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    We often think of bones as static, lifeless structures, but scientists are learning that bones are far more dynamic than once believed and play important roles in immunity, kidney health, and metabolism. Now research published in Nature has identified a hormone produced by bone cells that helps regulate appetite in mice, a finding that adds to the understanding of weight management and potentially cancer risk.

    Obesity increases risk of many types of cancer.

    Scientists have long known that fat cells produce a hormone called lipocalin-2, but the researchers in this study discovered that bone-forming cells produce as much as 10 times more lipocalin-2 than fat cells. Read more… “Bone-derived Hormone Regulates Appetite in Mice”

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      Want to live a longer, healthier life? Eat nuts, study says

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      A new study published in BMC Medicine suggests that eating just a handful of nuts every day can reduce your risk of developing many chronic diseases, including cancer and heart diseases, which account for more than 25 million deaths per year worldwide.

      Nuts contain protein, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, and many beneficial phytochemicals. Some research suggests that eating nuts might lower cholesterol and help maintain healthy blood sugar levels in people who have diabetes.

      The researchers analyzed the results of 20 population studies of more than 800,000 people. Studies were performed over a period of several decades up to the present to see if there was a relationship between eating nuts and lower risk of disease.  Read more… “Want to live a longer, healthier life? Eat nuts, study says”

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