Broccoli extract may lower blood sugar among some with diabetes, study finds

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Nearly 30 million people in the United States have type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the chances of developing diabetes. Both obesity and diabetes are linked to cancer.

Findings from a new study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine suggest that sulforaphane, a phytochemical that has shown strong cancer-preventive actions in lab and clinical studies, might also reduce some of the harmful effects of type 2 diabetes in obese adults.

“Sulforaphane is useful not only for cancer prevention but it also demonstrates anti-diabetes and many other activities,” says Jed Fahey, ScD, Director of the Cullman Chemoprotection Center at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and one of the authors on the study. Read more… “Broccoli extract may lower blood sugar among some with diabetes, study finds”

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    Tea links to epigenetic changes among women, study finds

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    Aging, your environment, and certain lifestyle choices, such as what you eat or drink, can modify your DNA, without changing its overall structure. This type of modification is called an epigenetic change, and can turn your genes on or off.

    A new study suggests that drinking tea may lead to epigenetic changes among women. Those changes could play a role in altering risk of certain diseases, including cancer. The study was published in the journal Human Molecular Genetics. Read more… “Tea links to epigenetic changes among women, study finds”

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      A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth

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      A hormone produced by the liver called fibroblast growth factor 21, or FGF21, might play a role in curbing your sweet cravings, suggests a recent study published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

      The brain and gut (which includes the liver) work together in what’s called the central reward system to control what we like and choose to eat – including sweets. Differences in that system can promote unhealthy eating habits, which can lead to obesity, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Read more… “A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth”

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