Men’s Health and Weight Loss: Why a Salad is Cool

A few months ago I wrote about some challenges women face when it comes to weight loss – menopause, pleasing your family, and post-partum weight retention. Obesity is linked to cancer, so it’s important to think about how we can all maintain a healthy weight to decrease our cancer risk. With this being National Men’s Health Week, I’d like to focus on ways to overcome some unique challenges I hear from men who are working to lose weight and stay healthy.canstockphoto

1. “There’s usually lots of beer, nachos or other unhealthy foods when I go out with my friends.”

Whether its watching sports or other get togethers, it’s hard to eat healthy when you’re surrounded by indulgences. Distractions like TV make it even harder to pay attention to what (and how much) you’re eating.

Solution: There are a few ways to make a situation like this easier. First, you can eat before you go. If you aren’t hungry, enjoy the event and the company around you without all the eating and drinking. If you want to drink alcohol, make sure to have a tall glass of water before or after a drink. That’s a good way to stay hydrated and just slow down a bit to limit the number of drinks. Another strategy if you’re at a house gathering, bring healthier foods like raw cut veggies and salsa, and drinks like seltzer water.

2. “A salad isn’t cool.”
You might know what the healthier option is, but it’s hard to select the greens if your friends give you a hard time for ordering something healthy. Continue reading


Make-Ahead Healthy Lunches, Your Way

AICR’s Recipe March Madness – down to the Final 4 today – inspired me to share a recent kick I’ve been on to make a one-pot dish on Sunday that I pack for lunches throughout the week. With a little preparation and planning (and it doesn’t take much!) I end up with about 5 delicious and inexpensive lunches filled with cancer-protective nutrients.canstockphoto14256168

I start with a grain and cook 1 cup dry (to yield about 2 to 3 cups cooked) according to package instructions. Lately I’ve been using quinoa because it cooks fast, is delicious and packed full of protein and fiber, but you could also use brown rice, farro, bulgur or another whole grain. I cook it in a low sodium vegetable broth instead of water to give it a little extra flavor. Once cooked, let the grain cool in the fridge.

Next I pick a few ingredients to mix in, always with some added vegetables and/or fruit. Then I pack it into individual containers so I can grab for lunch in the mornings.

Here are three versions you can make with a few simple additions to the already prepared grain-base. When you make dishes like this, you can change the ingredients based on what you have around! Continue reading


I Saw It on TV… Weight-Loss Myths Women Hear

With AICR’s new report showing for the first time that obesity is linked to ovarian cancer, there are now even more reasons for women to maintain a healthy body weight. I’ve already written about challenges women face when it comes to weight loss, and a recent blog by Colby describes some of the many nutrition myths surrounding cancer risk.iStock_000004672120Small

To help women reduce their risk of ovarian cancer, getting to a healthy weight matters. Let’s look at a few of the many weight loss myths I hear daily from women:

1.    “I heard on Dr. Oz…” This is the start of many conversations I have with patients. It is usually followed by some supplement (e.g. garcinia cambogia) that “leads to weight loss.” There are usually few studies supporting the weight loss benefits of these supplements, potential risks or side effects from taking the supplement, and there is ALWAYS the caveat that a healthy diet and physical activity are needed for it to work. Continue reading