Liver Cancer Death Rates Steadily Rising, Many Cases Preventable

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Deaths from liver cancer have steadily increased over the past several years, with higher rates of mortality affecting most regions of the country, according to two recently published studies. The deaths are largely caused by consuming high amounts of alcohol.

AICR research shows a clear link between heavy alcohol consumption and liver cancer, finding that three drinks a day increase risk of this cancer.

Read more… “Liver Cancer Death Rates Steadily Rising, Many Cases Preventable”

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    From Space to Cancer Survivors, Applying Exercise Research to Protect Health

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    Many cancer survivors and astronauts have something in common: their bodies can experience years of aging after only a few month of treatment – or space flight. Exercise can help, says Jessica Scott, PhD, a Principal Investigator at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Before focusing on cancer patients, Scott worked at the Johnson Space Center, helping astronauts keep their heart and muscles healthy. Here, she talks about the emerging field of exercise-oncology and how applying the research related to astronauts can help survivors prevent or slow accelerated aging.

    Read more… “From Space to Cancer Survivors, Applying Exercise Research to Protect Health”

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      Diabetes After Age 50 Signals Risk of Pancreatic Cancer, New Study

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      Adults with type 2 diabetes face a lot of serious health disorders, including about twice the increased risk of pancreatic cancer as those without the disease. Pancreatic cancer is relatively rare but typically has poor survival, partly because it’s often not diagnosed until the late stages.
      Now a study suggests that the development of diabetes can be an early sign of pancreatic cancer for African-Americans and Latinos who are diagnosed with diabetes later in life. This study also confirms previous research, that having diabetes increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer.
      The study was published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

      Diabetes is more common in African-Americans and Latinos than white individuals living in the US. African Americans also have higher rates of pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality than any other racial or ethnic group.

      Read more… “Diabetes After Age 50 Signals Risk of Pancreatic Cancer, New Study”

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