More Fun Summer Book Recommendations, Health Related

In today’s Cancer Research Update, we have nine great book recommendations – all health related. But we had so many suggestions they all didn’t make the list.

Here’s a few more recommendations, from the professionals that couldn’t choose only one and from AICR staff. Thanks to all. And if you have a health-related book, please share.Apple on pile of books on grass. Education concept, back to scho

Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach
This book goes into how our digestion system works, from our saliva to gut bacteria. She’s an entertaining writer; she wrote a book called Stiff on cadavers, which is a fun read too.

Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen
 by Christopher McDougall
The author tells the story of an isolated tribe’s great distance runners, who can run hundreds of miles without rest. This book will motivate any one at any fitness level to get out and run – you can’t help but be inspired by this story.

The Heart of the Plate: Vegetarian Recipes for a New Generation by Mollie Katzen
The author of The Moosewood Cookbook, Mollie again provides recipes that help you take plant-focused eating from a “should” because it’s healthy to something so enjoyable, you are delighted to make vegetable-focused dishes the main focus of a meal. As a bonus, she includes a short section on stocking the kitchen with ingredients and tools that make healthful cooking easier.

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation by Michael Pollan
This is a book on the history and culture of cookery. It discusses cooking methods and the science behind food. After reading this, if you’ve lost your way from cooking real whole foods at home, you’ll find yourself back in the kitchen! If not, you’ll increase your culinary mastery. Continue reading


Is eating organic food better for reducing my cancer risk?

Is eating organic food better for reducing my cancer risk?

It’s one of the most asked questions we get – especially now, with a new review of the research suggesting that organics contain more antioxidants than conventional foods.canstockphoto20873615

With all the research on fruits, vegetables and other plant foods and cancer, AICR hasn’t had a lot to say about organics. There has been relatively little research on organics and cancer risk, with no clear conclusions except one: eating a diet that is mainly from plants – whether they are organic or conventional – reduces the risk of cancer.

The new analysis, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, included 343 studies from 1992 to 2012. (1992 was when the European Union started regulating organic farming; about 70% of the studies were from Europe.)

The authors looked at how organics and conventional plant foods compared in vitamins, minerals and groups of phytochemicals that have shown antioxidant — and cancer-protective — activity in lab studies. The researchers also compared levels of pesticide compounds.

Continue reading


Survey: Diners – Especially Women – Using Posted Menu Calories

If you spot calorie information on your restaurant menu, does it help you decide what to order?http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-woman-ordering-food-image21147851

For about six of every ten adults living in select states, that calorie information does help them decide what to order. At least sometimes, that is, with about one of every ten diners using that nutrition information for every purchase, according to a new government survey.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study comes from residents of 17 states that have menu labeling and completed a 2012 phone survey about it. In 2010, a federal law required chain restaurants to display the calories of their menu items, and some states started those requirements quickly.  Given that some studies show Americans eat up to a quarter of our calories at restaurants, using calorie information may help restaurant-goers make healthier choices. That, in turn, can reduce cancer risk.

Respondents were only counted if they visited fast food or chain restaurants and noticed the menu labeling. Among the findings: Continue reading