Health Talk: Do eggs increase ovarian cancer risk?

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Right now, the research does not show any strong link between eggs and ovarian cancer risk. There have been a few studies that have found a modest increased risk of ovarian cancer among women with the highest weekly egg consumption compared to those who don’t eat eggs. However, the studies that show a link are usually the study types more likely to have problems accurately estimating egg consumption and controlling for other potential influences on risk.

And many studies examining this link have not adjusted for being overweight, which increases ovarian cancer risk. A recent analysis of the global research on eggs and ovarian cancer risk by the American Institute for Cancer Research found that current evidence is too limited to support any conclusion. More research is needed.

42372485 - eggs in a bowl with whisk

Theoretically, high consumption of eggs’ cholesterol could lead to formation of compounds that pose risk. Yet it’s also possible that eggs’ rich content of choline (an essential nutrient) could play a role in maintaining healthy DNA to reduce cancer risk. Read more… “Health Talk: Do eggs increase ovarian cancer risk?”

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    Nordic, Anti-Inflammatory and Intermittent: Eating Patterns for Cancer Prevention

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    Research increasingly looks to overall dietary pattern, rather than any single nutrient, phytochemical or even food, to reduce cancer risk. How appropriate, therefore, that the closing session of the 2014 AICR Research Conference focused on the latest research on several popular dietary patterns.canstockphoto2916430

    The New Nordic Diet originated in Denmark to create a healthy eating pattern that suits the foods and flavor palate of Scandinavian countries. The diet’s heavy on fish, cruciferous and root vegetables (like cabbage and carrots) and oatmeal; it’s lighter on pork and other red meats. You’ve probably heard about a Mediterranean dietary pattern’s association with lower risk heart disease and other health benefits, but some featured foods are not universally accessible or familiar.

    At the conference, Thomas Meinert Larsen, PhD, showed results of studies in which intensive half-year programs of people following the New Nordic Diet brought improvements in heart health risks and weight loss. This shows potential to reduce cancer risk, with eating changes that participants actually enjoyed. Read more… “Nordic, Anti-Inflammatory and Intermittent: Eating Patterns for Cancer Prevention”

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      Overloaded on Nutrition Research? How to Find Clarity.

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      “Why didn’t they teach any of this in med school?” So began the question and answer session following my presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). My topic: “Information Overload! Helping Patients Distinguish Evidence-Based vs. Anecdotal Nutrition Strategies.”iStock_000005236823_Small

      If you sometimes have a sense of information overload about what the research is saying when it comes to cancer prevention, heart disease and other areas of your health, you’re not alone.

      Headlines regularly contradict each other about “must-include super foods”, rules about what to avoid, and suggestions that long-held nutrition mantras don’t make any difference after all. As it turns out, the health professionals at AACVPR made it clear that it’s not only their patients who are feeling information overload; they are, too.

      In my presentation, we looked at common areas of confusion, going beyond the headlines to put studies within context of overall research.

      •    Some observational population studies don’t show a difference in heart disease risk with higher saturated fat. That highlights the importance of looking at overall eating Read more… “Overloaded on Nutrition Research? How to Find Clarity.”

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