Health Talk: How many vegetables should I be eating? What about my kids?

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Q: I keep seeing recommendations about cups of vegetables, but I’m confused about how many I should be eating. What about my kids?

A: If you’re like most adults, you should be aiming for 2 to 3 cups of vegetables a day, as seen in the Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern from the Dietary Guidelines. This amount also holds for children ages 9 and older. Targets for children age 8 and under, are less – about 1 to 1.5 cups a day.

“Cups” of vegetables mostly refers to a portion equal to one measuring cup for raw or cooked vegetables. For lettuce, spinach or other raw leafy vegetables however, two cups count as a cup. A medium carrot, celery stalk and small pepper each count as half a cup. If you don’t want to measure, an average adult fist is a rough guide to a 1-cup portion. So you can aim for one to two fist-size portions of vegetables at lunch and dinner each day. Read more… “Health Talk: How many vegetables should I be eating? What about my kids?”

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    Health Talk: Do eggs increase ovarian cancer risk?

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    Right now, the research does not show any strong link between eggs and ovarian cancer risk. There have been a few studies that have found a modest increased risk of ovarian cancer among women with the highest weekly egg consumption compared to those who don’t eat eggs. However, the studies that show a link are usually the study types more likely to have problems accurately estimating egg consumption and controlling for other potential influences on risk.

    And many studies examining this link have not adjusted for being overweight, which increases ovarian cancer risk. A recent analysis of the global research on eggs and ovarian cancer risk by the American Institute for Cancer Research found that current evidence is too limited to support any conclusion. More research is needed.

    42372485 - eggs in a bowl with whisk

    Theoretically, high consumption of eggs’ cholesterol could lead to formation of compounds that pose risk. Yet it’s also possible that eggs’ rich content of choline (an essential nutrient) could play a role in maintaining healthy DNA to reduce cancer risk. Read more… “Health Talk: Do eggs increase ovarian cancer risk?”

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      Nordic, Anti-Inflammatory and Intermittent: Eating Patterns for Cancer Prevention

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      Research increasingly looks to overall dietary pattern, rather than any single nutrient, phytochemical or even food, to reduce cancer risk. How appropriate, therefore, that the closing session of the 2014 AICR Research Conference focused on the latest research on several popular dietary patterns.canstockphoto2916430

      The New Nordic Diet originated in Denmark to create a healthy eating pattern that suits the foods and flavor palate of Scandinavian countries. The diet’s heavy on fish, cruciferous and root vegetables (like cabbage and carrots) and oatmeal; it’s lighter on pork and other red meats. You’ve probably heard about a Mediterranean dietary pattern’s association with lower risk heart disease and other health benefits, but some featured foods are not universally accessible or familiar.

      At the conference, Thomas Meinert Larsen, PhD, showed results of studies in which intensive half-year programs of people following the New Nordic Diet brought improvements in heart health risks and weight loss. This shows potential to reduce cancer risk, with eating changes that participants actually enjoyed. Read more… “Nordic, Anti-Inflammatory and Intermittent: Eating Patterns for Cancer Prevention”

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