In Memoriam: Dr. John Milner

All of us at the American Institute for Cancer Research are grieving the loss of our dear friend and colleague Dr. John Milner, who passed away suddenly on New Year’s Eve.

Dr. Milner was a tireless, eloquent and impassioned champion of research into nutrition’s role in cancer risk. We will rememberNo Slide Title him as a true leader whose combination of dedication, intellect and personal charm brought experts from many different fields together. His warm and garrulous presence, and his sage advice, will be greatly missed.

Dr. Milner was a longtime friend to AICR, serving for many years as a member of our grant review panel and our research conference planning committee.

During his time as chief of the National Cancer Institute’s Nutrition Science Research Group, where he helped shape the nation’s scientific inquiry into diet and cancer prevention, he served as the NCI observer for the Expert Panel that authored the AICR/WCRF report, Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective.

His involvement in the field of nutrition dates back to his student days at Oklahoma State University, when a work-study job in a research laboratory triggered a lifelong interest in fighting disease. After earning his PhD from Cornell University, Milner was recruited for the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he met Mary Frances Picciano, PhD, who would later become his wife. Continue reading


Is My Christmas Ham a Processed Meat?

Simply put? Yep.

“Processed meat” is any meat that’s preserved by salting, smoking or curing, or by adding chemical preservatives. That means sausage, bacon, cold cuts like pastrami and salami, hot dogs and, yes, ham.bigstock-Dinner-Festive-4350476

Why does it matter whether or not ham counts as processed meat? Because the evidence on processed meat is different than the evidence on red meat, so our recommendations are different, too.

AICR’s expert report and its updates have consistently and convincingly shown that diets high in red meat are a cause of colorectal cancer. This is why we recommend moderating red meat intake to keep it below 18 ounces (cooked) per week. In studies, consumption at or below this threshold is not associated with increased risk.

When it comes to processed meat, the evidence is just as consistent and convincing — but a good deal more stark. That’s because the evidence on processed meat suggests that no “safe threshold” exists. A modest increase in risk for colorectal cancer is seen with even occasional consumption of processed meat, and continues to rise as consumption increases. Continue reading


Holiday Hang-Ups: Staying Healthy in the Workplace

You sit all day. The vending machine’s full of sugary soda. Sandy from Accounting keeps a heaping bowl of fun-size candy at her desk, which you walk past on your way to and from the copier.

bigstock-an-apple-is-on-a-computer-keyb-44723527The workplace is where you spend most of your waking time, a closed environment filled with constant inducements to move less and eat more. At holiday time, those inducements multiply. Today, more and more Human Resources professionals are taking steps to create healthier workplaces, because they know that healthier employees are happier — and, yes, more productive.

Here at AICR, we’ve taken a series of steps to ensure we’re practicing what we preach. Here’s just a few of the ideas we’ve instituted:

  • The AICR Walking Club meets three times a week at lunchtime for a brisk walk around the neighborhood. The group activity helps members motivate one another to get and stay active. We’re looking into a running group for those employees who want to kick up their activity even more. Continue reading