Talking About… Processed Meat and Cancer

meat delicaciesDiets high in red and processed meats are a cause of colorectal cancer. Period.

That finding from our 2007 expert report was only strengthened in the 2010 Continuous Update Project Report on Colorectal Cancer, which reviewed evidence published since the 2007 report.

At this writing, more studies continue to be added to the CUP database; in 2017, the CUP expert panel will review the collected evidence once again and issue updated Recommendations for Cancer Prevention.

The existence of a link between red and processed meat and colorectal cancer is no longer surprising. But now researchers are asking the next questions –1. What is it, exactly, in red and processed meat that’s responsible for the increased risk, and 2. Is there anything we can do about it?

Amanda J. Cross, PhD, of Imperial College London, UK, will be presenting evidence tomorrow at our 2013 AICR Research Conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer. Continue reading


For Cancer Researchers, A Social Media Wake-Up Call

This year, AICR is trying something different at our Annual Research Conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer next week. Something we hope will act as a clarion call for cancer researcher and health professionals.canstockphoto6433880

We’ve all gone to conferences where the social media engagement is limited to attendees being encouraged to tweet their experiences. But at a breakfast session first thing in the morning on November 8th, AICR is hosting a special panel to discuss how scientists can engage in meaningful conversations with the public using social media.

There is an urgent need for responsible, evidence-based cancer information in social media, and unfortunately this need, in many cases, is now being met by self-appointed health “gurus” who make unverifiable or patently false claims. Now is the time for informed, rational voices to enter the furious ongoing discussion. We must provide context and sober, well-informed resources and information.

Social media gives scientists and practitioners with a means of sharing their work and engaging in a meaningful two-way discussion with a wider audience. Continue reading


Progress in Prevention: The Affordable Care Act

Leave the politics aside, if you can. All of us who work to fight cancer and other chronic diseases can agree on one thing: We need to do more than treat the problem. We need an increased national focus on preventiohttp://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-nutritionist-holding-green-apple-weight-scale-image28463742n.

The Affordable Care Act that goes into action tomorrow, October 1, marks significant progress on that score. Its increased focus on obesity is an acknowledgement that obesity causes major health issues. AICR research shows that obesity increases the risk for seven different cancers.

For the first time, you can receive obesity screening and counseling at no charge. This handy USA Today article reviews some of the ways that different plans will address obesity counseling and related efforts. Continue reading