AICR Welcomes Oncology Group’s New Position on Obesity

obesity-and-cancerToday, in a bold position paper published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the American Society of Clinical Oncology alerted its members and the public to the clear and convincing link between obesity and cancer, and outlined a strategy for combating obesity that will help reduce cancer incidence in the years ahead.

“Obesity is a major, under-recognized contributor to the nation’s cancer toll and is quickly overtaking tobacco as the leading preventable cause of cancer,” reads the JCO paper.

We at AICR strongly agree, and officially welcome today’s development as important progress in much-needed prevention efforts that could save millions of American lives in the years ahead.

The reason this JCO position paper is so important is because oncologists stand on the front lines of our national battle against cancer, and are uniquely positioned to counsel patients about weight management.

The paper goes on to outline a series of new ASCO initiatives to:

1) increase education and awareness of the obesity-cancer link;

2) provide tools to help oncologist address obesity with their patients;

3) foster research to better understand how to best help their patients manage their weight, and;

4) advocate for policy to make the kind of societal changes that will make it easier for patients to manage their weight.

AICR is delighted to have ASCO officially weighing in on this vital area, and we are excited to offer any help we can. We’ve established the evidence base that shows that obesity increases the risk for eight different cancers. In the coming months and years, our ongoing analysis will likely find even more. In the meantime, we’ve developed interactive tools, brochures and infographics to raise awareness about the obesity-cancer link, and evidence-based advice for individuals on how to lose weight and lower their risk.

But the statistics are stark, and they challenge before us is great. It will take all of us working together to combat obesity and the chronic diseases that follow on from it. We are grateful to have an old ally officially declare itself and join us in the fight.


Research Preview: Life After Childhood Cancer and The Goldilocks Effect

It’s our favorite time of year. All of us at AICR are eagerly gearing up for our annual research conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer here in Washington, DC, from October 29-31.

We spend the months in the run-up to the research conference looking forward to welcoming hundreds of investigators, clinicians, nurses, registered dietitians, policy makers and members of the media wGenetically Modified foodho are passionately interested in how nutrition, physical activity and obesity intersect with cancer risk.

Selecting which subjects will make for engaging and enlightening conference sessions is a job our Conference Program Committee takes seriously, and for good reason: the AICR conference’s focus on the nutrition and cancer connection is unique and specific, and it continues to sets us apart.

Our Program Committee is keenly aware that making a topic the subject of an AICR conference session does far more than simply gather scientists in a room to discuss the latest findings. It also serves to raise the visibility of a research topic before a global audience of scientists, health professionals, shapers of health policy, and the press. In a very real sense it can help drive the research agenda for the field. Continue reading


The Science of Common Sense: More Evidence that AICR Recommendations Save Lives

Last week, yet another independent scientific study added to the robust evidence that following AICR’s 10 Recommendations for Cancer Prevention is powerfully protective against a great many diseases and conditions, not simply cancer alone.

This latest study found that childhood cancer survivors who follow more of our Recommendations are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that raises the risk for heart disease and other health problems. We wrote about this new study in this week’s Cancer Research Update, our biweekly email newsletter on breaking cancer news.

Screen Shot 2014-08-07 at 11.38.01 AMPrevious independent studies have shown that our Recommendations protect against breast cancer and prostate cancer, reduce risk for cancer death, help people live longer, and improve cancer survivors’ physical and mental health. This latest study is a welcome addition to the ever-growing evidence that our advice maximizes your chances for leading a long and healthy life.

But in a way, it just makes sense. Continue reading