Bountiful Beans

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Today’s AICR Health-e-Recipe helps you fill up, not fill out.

Three-Bean Chili uses beans to satisfy your appetite while adding cancer-fighting folate (a B vitamin), fiber and plant-based protein to your meal. Kids love ’em, they come in many colors and they’re used in almost every kind of cuisine . Beans dry mixed

And they’re cheap! Soak your own dried beans or empty a can into a colander, rinse and drain them. Then toss them into hot dishes, cold salads, or blend them with some salsa for a delicious, healthy dip.

Check AICR’s Test Kitchen for more bean recipes, or order our free brochure, Beans and Whole Grains: The New American Plate, for lots more info and recipes.

Subscribe to AICR’s Health-e-Recipes, and get a free healthy, tested AICR recipe delivered to your inbox every Tuesday.

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    This Week’s AICR Health-e-Recipe: Healthy Pesto Possibilities

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    bigstockphoto_olive oil_2330122If you love pesto sauce but can’t find pine (pignoli) nuts, relax. Today’s Health-e-Recipe for Pesto Toastini from AICR uses blanched almonds for the nuts – one of severalGetty almonds FD002107_47 substitutions that still gives you a great-tasting pesto. (Walnuts are another great swap for pine nuts).

    Baby spinach and parsley add variety and phytochemicals to green basil. And in olive oil, scientists continue to find healthy compounds – not only polyphenols and carotenoids, but also oleocanthal, which has anti-inflammatory benefits, according to the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

    Here’s how to sign up to receive your weekly Health-e-Recipe, straight from the AICR Test Kitchen.

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      Cancer Rehab: A Growing Demand

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      More than 14 percent of cancer survivors were first diagnosed more than 20 years ago? That’s why survivors’ visibility is growing, said Julia H. Rowland, PhD, Director of the National Cancer Institute’s Office of Cancer Survivorship, along with public demand for rehabilitation programs akin to cardiac patient programs.

      “We can’t just ‘treat and street’ anymore,” she said.

      Helping people learn what they can do to help themselves stay well with diet, nutrition and physical activity is key to helping them manage cancer and succeed at survivorship. “We need to inform survivors and their families of of cancer prevention strategies because behaviors occur in the context of families,” she added. Leveraging the support of other cancer survivors holds much potential for cancer rehab programs in the future–combined with health care professionals, the insurance industry and government as a prevention and cost-saving measure. Studies are beginning to look at people living longer with cancer and additional health problems that develop with aging.

      Registered Dietitian Diana Dyer — a nationally recognized 2-time breast cancer survivor whose endowment benefits AICR — said to “Separate hope from hype or harm” — advice to cancer patients who are overwhelmed by the tidal wave of information when first diagnosed. “Plant foods are powerful,” she said. Making nutrition guidance for survivors a priority is being boosted by a new oncology certification for dietitians offered by the American Dietetic Association.

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