Packing Whole Grains for Lunch, Recipe

If you’re trying to eat healthier at work — after all, its National Employee Wellness Month –  packing a lunch that’s high in fiber can give you lasting energy for the workday while helping you prevent cancer. Take our Health-e-Recipe for Lemon Brown Rice Pilaf.canstockphoto8528856

Toss this rice with a little tuna or salmon (buy it canned in water, then drained) plus some leafy greens and salad veggies for a complete meal. You can make a batch for a weekend meal then divide the leftovers into single portions and refrigerate or freeze them for lunches throughout the workweek.

Roasting lemon slices make brown rice tangy, and it’s an easy step that only takes a little time. When coated with olive oil and roasted, lemons’ natural sugar caramelizes into a rich dark brown that coats the rind. Continue reading


Barbecue Favorite: Healthy Chicken Kebabs

chicken-kabobsFor your Memorial Day barbecue this year, try our Mediterranean-style Cypriot Chicken Kebabs.

Perfect for a summer meal, these kebabs can be baked or grilled. The chicken is marinated overnight in a tasty blend of extra virgin olive oil, apple cider vinegar, mustard, oregano, garlic and parsley. Then it is skewered with cherry tomatoes, chunks of zucchini and pieces of red bell pepper. All of these plant-based foods contain cancer-fighting compounds.

Dip your juicy chicken kebabs into the summery green dressing of mint, peas, cumin, garlic and lemon juice. With only 200 calories per serving, you can serve these kebabs with brown rice or another whole grain to soak up the juices, plus a mixed green salad.

Find more healthy, colorful and appetizing dishes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.  


Treat Mom to A Healthy Brunch

mushroom-crepe croppedFor Mother’s Day, impress her with our Health-e-Recipe for Chickpea Crepes with Spinach, Mushroom and Pesto.

These unusual treats use chickpea (garbanzo) flour, often found in the gluten-free section in your supermarket. Chickpeas are in the bean family and provide fiber, vitamins and minerals.

Crepes are thin pancakes that are popular in France and Italy. It isn’t hard to get the knack of making them – it’s all in the wrist! Just rotate the pan as you pour the batter so it flows into a round shape that thinly coats your pan. Cook each crepe 1-2 minutes over medium heat until golden, then use a large spatula to gently loosen and then slide it onto a large plate. Re-oil pan and repeat the process for each crepe.

Adding spinach, mushrooms and red peppers bring each filled crepe’s cancer-fighting fiber content to 4 grams. These and all plant foods are loaded with different cancer-fighting compounds. Eating a variety gives you a combination of phytochemicals such as indoles, carotenoids, flavonoids and others that work together to reduce cancer risk.

Find more excellent cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.