A Vegan Saag Packed with a Medley of Cancer-Protection

spinach-saag-and-golden-tofu copyFans of Indian food know that saag is a spinach sauce seasoned with cumin, turmeric and other spices that have cancer-preventing qualities. Our new Healthy Recipe for Spinach Saag (pronounced sog) uses health-protective soy as the protein in this delicious dish.

Restaurants feature saag made with paneer, a type of Indian cottage cheese. Paneer has a similar texture and color to firm tofu, made from soybeans. Soy adds protein, nutrients and a set of phytochemicals called isoflavones to your foods.

In this recipe, the tofu is given an appetizing golden color from sautéing first in neutrally-flavored canola oil. If the canola oil doesn’t produce enough of a golden effect, stir in a pinch of turmeric as you sautee it. When you add the tofu to the spinach sauce, it will absorb the flavors of the turmeric, ginger, cumin, coriander, garam masala spice mix and onions. Continue reading

6 Tips to Spring into Beautiful, Practical Asparagus

5-26 asparagus blog 9407278_m copySpring asparagus is here and cooking up elegant spears of bright green asparagus takes only minutes and supplies cancer-preventing compounds in any meal. All asparagus is a good source of the B vitamin folate and vitamins C and A, as well as antioxidant compounds like glutathione and rutin.

Here’s a few tips to cook and enjoy this versatile vegetable.

1. Refrigerate raw asparagus like a bouquet, upright with the bottoms of the stalks in a jar or container of water and the tops covered with a plastic bag up to four days.

2. Try not to waterlog and overcook asparagus by boiling it too much. Instead, preserve its color freshness and crunch by microwaving it or steaming over water for just a few minutes.

3. After washing the asparagus, break or cut at an inch or two off the tougher bottom ends of the stalks. Then cut it into smaller pieces or leave the stalks intact. Continue reading

Mediterranean Marinade, Easy Steps for Healthy Grilling

If you’re planning on firing up the grill over Memorial Day Weekend, plan to marinate your food before cooking. Marinating is a centuries-long practice that tenderizes, flavors and preserves vegetables and meat. Some evidence even shows it may reduce formation of cancer-causing substances that are produced when meat is grilled.

Marinating also lets you be creativeMarinating Chicken with Lemon. Usually, marinades use acidic liquids like lemon juice and vinegar, with herbs, spices, garlic and other condiments such as mustard. But marinades contain a culture’s style – rice wine vinegar and ginger in Asia, mango or lime in Central and Southern America, chiles and yogurt in India and lemon and cinnamon in the Middle East.

Marinade ingredients like these are healthy, fat-free and rich in taste. When you marinate meat, poultry and fish, be sure to discard the marinade in which the meat soaked. If you want, before you add it to the meat, set some aside to use for basting the meat during cooking.

Try our Healthy Recipe for Cypriot Chicken Kebabs, featuring a delicious Continue reading