The Beauty of Beets…Countdown to Vote

beet-salad croppedOnce you’ve tasted fresh beets, you’ll be enchanted by their sweet taste and beautiful color. Our Health-e-Recipe for Beet, Carrot and Apple Salad shreds them with tart Granny Smith apples, carrots and chopped walnuts into a cancer-preventive salad.

Beets contain potassium, vitamin C, folate and fiber. Their phytochemicals include betalains, a class of health-protecting compounds that may be best absorbed when uncooked. Beet greens – which can be eaten lightly steamed – provide lutein, a phytochemical that protects eyesight and is also found in spinach (a botanical relative of beets).

In the U.S., fresh beets are often roasted. Eating them raw is more unusual, yet once you have, you may prefer them to the pickled versions that are high in sodium and may be packaged with added sugar. (Our recipe also tells you how to peel them without coloring your hands red.)

This week’s recipe marks our #499th issue. You can help us pick our milestone 500th Health-e-Recipe by voting in our Championship Round. It’s Lasagna versus Brussels sprouts: Vote in Recipe 500.


A Cookie with a History (and Whole Grains)

anzac-cookies croppedApril is the month when soldiers in the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) fought the famous World War I battle at Gallipoli. Their bravery has been commemorated in part with a treat featured in our Health-e-Recipe for ANZAC Cookies.

Whole-wheat pastry flour plus oats and unsweetened shredded coconut help to make this cookie unique. Both contain dietary fiber that prevents colorectal cancer and possibly other types of cancer. These cookies are as nutritious today as when they were developed back then and sent to the troops in care packages from home.

You can make your own ANZAC Cookies to fortify yourself during a busy day. Enjoy them as a snack, a filling dessert or even a breakfast treat completed with some protein like low-fat yogurt and fruit.

This cookie makes us two shy of our 500th Health-e-Recipe. Vote for your pick of our milestone recipe on our Recipe March Madness, where you can also subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


At the Summit: Partnerships and Actions to Reduce Childhood Obesity

Last week’s 2014 summit of the Partnership for a Healthier America showed inspiring results from a growing number of non-profit, government and corporate collaborations for “Building a Healthier Future.”

The conference focused on how the many sectors in our society can support children – and Americans in general – in reducing obesity levels. And that’s important for cancer prevention, because after not smoking, obesity is the single largest risk factor for cancer.

Celebrating its fourth year, the Partnership’s meeting was graced by uplifting remarks from First Lady Michelle Obama, whose initiative Let’s Move to reduce childhood obesity and increase physical activity and healthy eating in hundreds of schools has been pivotal for the public-private partnerships now expanding that theme. Continue reading