Lose weight slow and steady – keep it off years later

By Posted on Leave a comment on Lose weight slow and steady – keep it off years later

If you’ve worked to lose weight, you may have found it just as challenging to keep it off months and years later. And there aren’t a lot of clear answers on how to avoid pounds creeping back on. But we do know that staying a healthy weight is one of the most important lifestyle factors you can do to reduce risk of many cancers, including postmenopausal breast, colorectal and esophageal.

Now, a recent study, published in Obesity, finds that slow and steady weight loss may be best. Taking that approach, even in the first few weeks of a program, may predict your ability to maintain that weight loss even up to 2 years later. Research has been mixed on whether consistency in weight loss and diet affects ability to keep weight off longer term. In this study, researchers compared those with steady weight loss to those with weight fluctuations in the first 6-12 weeks of the study to see how that affected their long term ability to maintain weight loss.

The scientists assigned 183 people to one of three groups with different diets. They met weekly for 6 months, then less often the rest of the year. Those who lost a consistent amount of weight week to week had low variability, and those who lost, for example, 5 pounds one week and then gained 3 and lost several again, had high weight variability. Read more… “Lose weight slow and steady – keep it off years later”

SHARE:

    What is a whole grain food? Researchers have an idea

    By Posted on 2 Comments on What is a whole grain food? Researchers have an idea

    When you eat brown rice, oatmeal or 100% whole wheat bread, you know it’s 100% whole grains. Choose pizza, wheat bread, or a breakfast cereal however, and it’s not always clear if you’re getting a whole grain food.

    Research shows that whole grains are an important part of a cancer preventive diet. AICR’s continuous update report on colorectal cancer found that foods containing fiber, such as whole grains, help lower risk for this cancer. And whole grains boost health in other ways, including promoting heart health.

    But how much whole wheat or oats, for example, do you need in a bread or cereal to say it is a whole grain?

    That’s the problem, say experts. There isn’t a global standard definition for what makes a whole grain food for food labeling. Some countries in Europe have their own distinct label guidelines for whole grain foods, and the US doesn’t have one at all, so now a group of scientists is working to find a common definition. Defining what a whole grain food is can help you can more easily identify and compare foods that contain whole grains. Read more… “What is a whole grain food? Researchers have an idea”

    SHARE:

      Eating breakfast and small dinner, not snacking, helps weight loss says new study

      By Posted on Leave a comment on Eating breakfast and small dinner, not snacking, helps weight loss says new study

      The evidence is not clear on how – or even whether – snacking, breakfast eating or meal size links to weight. A large study adds new data to this body of research suggesting that fewer daily meals and snacks can help prevent weight gain, at least for this healthy group. For cancer prevention, staying a healthy weight is key to reducing risk for many common cancers like endometrial, postmenopausal breast and colorectal.

      The authors analyzed data from the Adventist Health Study that includes over 50,000 North American adults. At the beginning of the study, participants reported their height and weight, as well as health habits like exercise, sleep and television watching. They also reported their eating habits via 24 hour recalls and a food frequency questionnaire.

      The participants – members of the Seventh Day Adventist Church – tend to be more health-conscious, nonsmokers, mostly nondrinkers and eat less meat than most Americans.

      Researchers used this data to determine how many meals – including snacks and breakfast – participants ate, and which meals were typically largest. They calculated  participants’ weight changes by comparing Body Mass Index (BMI) at the beginning and end of the study.

      An average of 7 years later, the study found:

      • For participants eating 1 or 2 meals a day, their BMI decreased in comparison to those eating 3 meals per day.

      Read more… “Eating breakfast and small dinner, not snacking, helps weight loss says new study”

      SHARE: