AICR Opposes Proposed Cuts to Science, Cancer Prevention Research

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Health and science research face massive cuts in last week’s proposed White House budget that — if enacted — would set back research on cancer prevention and ultimately cost lives, says the American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR).

The proposed budget for fiscal year 2018 slashes the National Institutes of Health funding by 5.8 billion dollars, approximately 19 percent. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the National Institutes of Health.

While the proposed budget does not give details on what will be eliminated, AICR stands against any cuts that will slow and possibly irrevocably setback the progress in improving cancer prevention and survivorship.

In 2017, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases. Over 600,920 people living in the United States will die from this disease. Research over the past few decades has led to a greater understanding of what drives cancer development and what protects us. Only through analyzing the global research has AICR’s network found many ways in which diet, weight management and physical activity lowers people’s cancer risk.

Research now shows that hundreds of thousands of US cancer cases can be prevented every year. At a time when the field has come so far, there is an urgent need to continue this research. Only through more study can individuals – and the country – prevent much of the cost, loss and suffering that cancer brings.

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    Can blackened toast and crispy french fries lead to cancer? AICR weighs in

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    Can burned toast and blackened potatoes lead to cancer? It’s a story making headlines today because of an initiative a UK government agency has taken to highlight a substance found in these products that are a “possible concern” for increased cancer risk.

    The compound is called acrylamide and it’s generally formed when you cook up some starchy foods at high temperatures, over 120 degrees. The sugars and amino acids in the foods cause a reaction, the Maillard reaction, which leads to acrylamide.

    In lab studies, animals consuming higher amounts of acrylamide get more cancer. Yet human studies on an acrylamide-cancer link are inconclusive.  Read more… “Can blackened toast and crispy french fries lead to cancer? AICR weighs in”

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