Healthy Recipe: Golden Vegan Veggie Balls

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Holiday cooking doesn’t have to focus on decadent casseroles, pounds of meat, and indulgent desserts. You can boost the delicious, health potential of holiday meals with more plant foods, such as whole grains, beans, and seasonal vegetables. After all, some of the most delicious items on the holiday table—green bean casserole, sweet potatoes, and stuffing—are all about plants.


If you’re trying to shine the light on plant foods this holiday, try making a plant-based entrée alternative. One of my favorite options is veggie “meatballs”—savory little balls filled with the goodness of beans, grains, vegetables, and herbs.

Read more… “Healthy Recipe: Golden Vegan Veggie Balls”

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    Exercise habits vary among breast cancer survivors, study finds

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    For cancer patients, research suggests that exercise offers plenty of benefits for long-term health and with cancer-related side effects. Yet  patients face numerous challenges to meet the aerobic and strength training recommendations.

    Now a study provides insights into improving adherence to a supervised exercise program among breast cancer patients, finding that attending an exercise program decreases as chemotherapy sessions increase. Cancer-related symptoms and appointments were among the most common reasons women did not attend the program.

    The study was published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

    Read more… “Exercise habits vary among breast cancer survivors, study finds”

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      HealthTalk: Is eating a late dinner hurting my health?

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      Q: I don’t get home until late. Is eating a late dinner hurting my health?

      A: Emerging research suggests that eating too late in the evening may lead to weight gain and increased health risks. So far, the studies raising concerns are mainly animal studies, human observational studies (which don’t prove cause-and-effect) and small clinical trials. And studies of dramatic shifts in eating time, as seen in people working night shifts, do not necessarily apply to people who only eat dinner a few hours past the norm.

      But putting the pieces of the puzzle together does suggest that it may be worth exploring options for readjusting habits.

      This booming field of research in meal timing involves “circadian misalignment,” when biological clocks in the body do not match up with each other. Our internal clocks produce biological rhythms driven mainly by a light-dark 24-hour cycle.

      For years, we’ve known that the brain’s biological clock affects our sleep cycles. Now scientists have discovered that organs like the liver, pancreas, body fat, muscle, and digestive tract all have their own independent biological clocks. Read more… “HealthTalk: Is eating a late dinner hurting my health?”

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