A Brussels Sprouts Makeover

You’ll find a delicious new way to enjoy an often pooh-poohed vegetable in today’s Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Potatoes. First, the sprouts and potatoes are roasted so they are tender and slightly sweet instead of boiled into a mushy mess. Taste-wise, potatoes and sprouts are a delectable pairing.

Second, the sprouts retain their cruciferous health benefits: like their relatives broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower, their phytochemicals such as sulforaphane continue to show cancer-fighting potential in research studies.

Third, Brussels Sprouts and potatoes both have plenty of dietary fiber, so that you get 6 grams in every serving of this recipe — nearly a quarter of the minimum daily amount (25 grams) health experts recommend. A high-fiber diet benefits your digestive system and may play a role in preventing cancer. Because this healthful recipe is made with olive oil and onions, which also contain phytochemicals, you can eat 2 servings without guilt.

You’ll find more delicious recipes for Brusssels Sprouts and other veggies from the AICR Test Kitchen; or check out the cancer-fighting recipes in Veggies, a free downloadable New American Plate brochure from AICR. Click here to subscribe to weekly Health-e-Recipes.


One thought on “A Brussels Sprouts Makeover

  1. I like your baked Brussels Sprouts idea and will
    try it soon.

    Currently, I am a patient at the University of Florida Proton Treatment Institute in Jacksonville,
    Florida. I expect to continue treatment for post-
    prostetectomy recurrent cancer after being cancer
    free for eight years. Treatment is scheduled through the first week in June 2011.

    I appreciate the work you are doing,

    David Turner

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